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Countering Extremism through The Classroom
Published in The Express Tribune, January 3rd, 2015. Mossarat Qadeem wrotes as an expert on countering violent extremism and the Executive Director of PAIMAN Trust.In this article, she offers strategies for using peace education with children from an early age, to counter violent extremism. This article appeared in the briefing book for the 2016 Human Rights Defenders Forum.
Los Angeles Framework for Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism
This proposal outlines a community-centered framework for preventing and countering violent extremism. The Los Angeles framework is based on a three-pillared approach, using prevention, intervention, and interdiction. Within these focus areas, outlined partnerships and policies include: issue-based educational workshops, town hall meetings, elevating the voice of faith leaders for nonviolence, community awareness briefings, integration services for refugees and asylees, and inter-generational cooperation.
Extremism's Earliest Critics
Long before the Islamic State (ISIS) was a fixture in world news, Syrian women were warning about the spread of extremism among the displaced and refugee population of their county. In 2012, still the early days of the war, one peace activist told me, “Our kids need schools, but the international community is absent. Instead,” she continued, “the Saudis are introducing their curricula to our communities.” Syrian children, she implied, were suddenly being exposed to materials that condoned intolerance and bigotry as the “true” Islam.
The Many Faces of Extremism
This live online roundtable addresses issues regarding development of an inclusive approach to white supremacy, one of the most severe threats to national security. ** We experienced a network interruption during the conversation, and there are a couple of blank spots in the stream archive. We apologize for the trouble. **
Extremism's Earliest Critics
Long before the Islamic State (ISIS) was a fixture in world news, Syrian women were warning about the spread of extremism among the displaced and refugee population of their county. In 2012, still the early days of the war, one peace activist told me, “Our kids need schools, but the international community is absent. Instead,” she continued, “the Saudis are introducing their curricula to our communities.” Syrian children, she implied, were suddenly being exposed to materials that condoned intolerance and bigotry as the “true” Islam.
Faith or Extremism?
Help for relatives: The Advice Centre on Radicalisation offers a guide to recognizing the signs of radicalization occurring in a friend, student or loved one, and offers strategies and solutions to help.
Preventing Violent Extremism
Various forms of violent extremism cause immense suffering the world-over – from ISIS to White Supremacist Groups to Boko Haram. Economic and social conditions in which everyone can meet their needs are the greatest preventative measure against violent extremism. How can we create conditions in which violent extremism can be combated and countered?
Introduction to WASL
The Women's Alliance for Security Leadership (WASL) brings together existing women’s networks, practitioners, and organizations with long-standing experience in addressing extremism and promoting peace, rights and pluralism to improve practices in communities affected by violence, and inform and offer pragmatic policy solutions for the international community.
What can the U.S. do to help make peace in Afghanistan?
"We want peace, but not at the cost of injustice." Judge Najla Ayoubi asks the U.S. government for help in elevating the role of women in Afghanistan and its support for a reconciliation process that allows victims' voices to be heard.
Muslim Voices: Grassroots Approaches to Peacebuilding
Violent extremist movements continue to fuel the world’s most challenging wars in Africa and Asia, and right-wing extremism in Europe and the United States has spawned homegrown terrorist networks and fueled the rise of Islamophobia. An approach that relies solely on an aggressive security framework has the potential to further marginalize at-risk communities and increase the threat of violent extremism. Instead, grassroots approaches to peacebuilding grounded in human rights principles are needed to bring the necessary changes for sustainable peace and social cohesion. --- Moderator: Houda Abadi, Ph.D is the associate director for the Middle East and North Africa at The Carter Center. She developed a coding methodology to analyze violent extremist propaganda, and designed a locally sensitive and inclusive grassroots project that prevents and combats extremism in all its forms. Prior to joining the Center, Abadi served as the director of education in two nonprofit organizations that work on conflict transformation, interfaith, and youth empowerment. Abadi holds an M.A. in international relations and diplomacy, with a concentration in Middle East studies and conflict resolution; and a Ph.D. in political communication and media studies. --- Participants: Sanaa Moussalim, Ph.D. is a scholar and civil rights activist. Dr. Moussalim is a former civil servant of the ministry of agriculture of Morocco and worked on external service for the Driss Benzekri Foundation for Human Rights and Democracy. She was also secretary general of REMADEL, the civil society network of local rural development initiatives in the Maghreb countries Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Mauretania. --- Imam Makram El-Amin is the imam of Masjid An-Bur in Minneapolis, Minnesota, one of the fastest-growing and most culturally diverse Muslim congregations in the United States. He is engaged in peacebuilding at the local and internal level, from mentoring men transitioning from prison to interfaith dialogue with Bishop Desmond Tutu and the Dali Lama. For more than two decades, Imam El-Amin’s work as a religious and community leader has been firmly rooted in the principles of human dignity and social justice. --- Youssef Chihab is the Director of the Europe Department and former Director of the Middle East and North Africa Department of the Alliance for Freedom and Dignity, a non-profit dedicated to the defense and promotion of human rights. Mr. Chihad holds a Bachelor of Laws and a Master’s degree in Political Science and Economics. He is an activist and inter-faith educator based in Belgium whose work centers on tolerance, diversity, and combatting extremism in all forms.
How can we revive ourselves and our communities?
Lisa Sharon Harper presents a view from the front line of the struggle against white nationalism -- hear from the author of "The Very Good Gospel", who participated in the August 12 peaceful protest against hate in Charlottesville, about how we can revive ourselves and our communities.
How can Boko Haram be defeated in Nigeria?
Fatima Akilu, a Nigerian expert in countering violent extremism, talks about saving a generation of young people from Boko Haram and other terrorist organizations through investments in peace building and counter-radicalization efforts including ideological disengagement, education, and psychological support.
Voice of a Practitioner in Pakistan - Mossarat Qadeem
Ms. Qadeem is co-founder of PAIMAN Alumni Trust, a nonprofit group promoting sociopolitical and economic empowerment of marginalized Pakistanis. With PAIMAN, she established the country’s first center for conflict transformation and peacebuilding, which has helped thousands of young people and women across the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pukhtunkwa province to prevent and resolve conflict. Their contribution is the development of PAIMAN's Mothers and Youth Peace Groups (TOLANA) an innovative way of neutralizing extremist tendencies through community mobilization, active citizenship and community empowerment for building social cohesion. Using Quran and Sunnah as the basis of alternate narrative to extremists’ narrative that they have developed and uses to reform and transform the extremist youth is other great achievement of her organization. Ms. Qadeem is an internationally known expert on countering violent extremism and de-radicalization and has contributed to the policy framework development of UNDTEC New York, UNWomen. She was a minister of information of Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Province in the interim government and remains a member of FATA Reform Commission. In this episode of the Center for Strategic International Studies podcast, Mossarat shares her experience as a practitioner countering violent extremism at the grassroots levels in some of the most conflict-affected areas of Pakistan. She talks about the importance of building trust at the community-level and the contributions women can make to peace and security – locally and globally.
How to protect refugees in Kenya and elsewhere?
Jedidah Wakonyo Waruhiu, a member of the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights, talks about the Somali refugee situation in Kenya and her government's attempts to close the Dadaab camp there, potentially fueling human rights abuses and violent extremism.
How to help survivors of Boko Haram?
Reverend Esther Ibanga talks about what is needed to help the survivors of Boko Haram successfully recover and reintegrate into society.
How can we help the victims of Boko Haram?
Reverend Esther Ibanga talks about what is needed to help the survivors of Boko Haram successfully recover and reintegrate into society.
The Rise of Islamophobia
Islamophobia and violent extremism are inextricably linked. As Islamophobia continues to grip much of the Western world, join us in discussing the effects of stigmatizing Muslims and learn more about what The Carter Center and others are doing to help stem the tide of anti-Muslim hatred and discrimination.